ONCE IN A LIFE TIME

The rare Super Blue Blood Moon Lunar Eclipse brought people all around outside to catch this spectacular trifecta phenomenon. On January 31st, 2018, people brought out their telescopes and cameras to capture this event. The last time a Total Lunar Eclipse coincided with a Blue Moon in the United States was in March 1866 - more than 150 years ago! This Total Lunar Eclipse was visible in most of North America, Australia, and East and Central Asia.

WHAT IS A SUPERMOON?

A Supermoon is the phenomenon whereby the Moon appears particularly large in the sky owing to the coincidence of its closest approach to the earth (the perigee) with a full Moon. Supermoons make the Moon appears brighter and larger than usual.

WHAT IS A BLUE MOON?

Contrary to the belief, a Blue Moon is not when the Moon turns Blue. In short, a Blue Moon is the definition of when there is a second Full Moon within a single calendar month.

WHAT IS A BLOOD MOON?

"The phenomenon whereby the Moon in Total Eclipse appears reddish in color as it is illuminated by sunlight filtered and refracted by the Earth's atmosphere."

What Is A Total Lunar Eclipse?
A total lunar eclipse is when Earth's shadow completely covers the moon and blocks the Sun's light, which otherwise reflects off the Moon.

 

For a full, in-depth description of a Total Lunar Eclipse, refer to the description below provided by space.com

"Total lunar eclipse: Earth's full (umbral) shadow falls on the moon. The moon won't completely disappear, but it will be cast in an eerie darkness that makes it easy to miss if you were not looking for the eclipse. Some sunlight passing through Earth's atmosphere is scattered and refracted, or bent, and refocused on the moon, giving it a dim glow even during totality. If you were standing on the moon, looking back at the sun, you'd see the black disk of Earth blocking the entire sun, but you'd also see a ring of reflected light glowing around the edges of Earth — that's the light that falls on the moon during a total lunar eclipse."

 

Images Below Taken With A Meade Telescope

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